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Online Houseplant Shops and Home Delivery Reviews

More and more people are finding houseplants online. While there is excitement and immediate gratification with shopping at local plant shops, you can take your time and find the perfect houseplant even if it’s not especially common. The plants don’t buy and ship themselves, however. You need to do the research, read the details about each houseplant delivery, and consult customer reviews so you can feel confident and get a great result. Here are the most popular options for online houseplant shops and home delivery.

Etsy Houseplant Vendors

This online marketplace is a collection of independent vendors, many of which sell and ship houseplants. Perhaps the best thing about shopping for houseplants on Etsy is that you get the indie vibe, while still having a virtually endless number of choices. You can find unique houseplants, pots, and arrangements compared to big-box stores.

Each vendor has its own plant prices, arrangements, shipping, and business policies. So if you want to know if an Etsy vendor offers great houseplants, it’s important to do some research about that individual vendor. For the past decade, Etsy has been one of the leading sources of houseplant delivery. It’s hard to completely eliminate a disappointing result, but reading through the vendor’s profile and customer reviews can go a long way toward avoiding the worst options.

Amazon and Big Box Store Houseplant Delivery

For the best combination of convenience and selection, you can look at these big-name brands. These companies generally have user-friendly websites, large catalogs of houseplants, and reliable payment methods. They can also make the necessary investments to create an efficient sales, packaging, and delivery model. Thus, they can maintain affordable prices while keeping most varieties of houseplants in stock.

There have also been plenty of false starts for online houseplant companies over the years, as customers have shown an enduring preference for in-store shopping experiences. Nevertheless, there are early signs, super-charged by the pandemic, that online shopping and home delivery of popular houseplants is going to stick this time. Amazon and Home Depot offers houseplant shipping directly to your home. Lowe’s and Ace Hardware has online ordering for their indoor plants, but customers must pick the plants up at their local store.

Online Houseplant Shops with Home Delivery

There are also dozens of online businesses that directly sell and ship houseplants to your home. Some of these companies focus on specific types of houseplants; others offer most every popular type of houseplant as well as a selection of more exotic plants. Some of these companies do nothing but plants; some offer other products and housewares. Each vendor has slightly different shipping policies and delivery coverage areas. Some make more of an effort to produce affordable houseplants, while others boast truly remarkable arrangements with ornate pots and containers.

As such, these companies may offer the best option for houseplants and indoor gardening projects, especially if you know what you’re looking for and are willing to take the time to do the research. Fortunately, we’ve made the process considerably easier for you by collecting the most popular online houseplant shops that offer home delivery.

  • The Sill
  • Bloomscape
  • Leon & George
  • Leaf and Clay
  • American Plant Exchange
  • Dandy Farmer
  • Terrain
  • Urban Stems
  • Horti
  • Modern Sprout
  • Greenery Unlimited
  • Nature Hills Nursery
  • Garden Goods Direct
  • Lula’s Garden
  • Bouq’s
  • com
  • ProFlowers
  • Hot Cactus
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Top 3 Houseplant Pest Control Solutions for Advanced Infestations

If you’re diligent about monitoring your houseplants, you may catch pests early enough to wash off the bugs and apply an insecticidal soap every week for a month and successfully beat back a mild infestation. For more advanced infestations, this type of treatment may not be enough. If you need to take more aggressive steps, here are our top three houseplant pest control solutions.

Adding a Whole House Humidifier or Dehumidifier

Individual houseplants may suffer from plant pests because they were already weakened in some way. Whether it’s aphids, mites, mealybugs, or fungus gnats, it doesn’t take long for the plant to be decimated. Neglected for too long, the entire plant may be infested and spread the problem to nearby plants. These pests can also be travel on the bottom of shoes, clothes, and pets.

Nevertheless, when all the houseplants in a home or living space are infested, the problem is often system. As such, there also needs to be a holistic solution. In most cases, this means looking at your home humidity level and the type of houseplant pest you’re dealing with. If you live in a dry climate and you’re fighting aphids, mites, mealybugs, thrips, or whiteflies, you may need to add a whole house humidifier to prevent these pests. If you want to salvage the houseplants you still have, you can also invest in a crop of predatory bugs that can be mailed to you. These predatory bugs often need moderate-to-high humidity levels to thrive, creating a powerful two-step pest control treatment. The opposite is also true. Peroxide may help keep fungus gnats at bay, but a permanent solution may also require a dehumidify to reduce fungal spores.

Propagate a New Houseplant

If you love a houseplant that has sustained moderate-to-heavy damage, the best chance you have to save the plant may be to create a cutting or divide the plant for propagation. This solution has the highest risk of failure or reinfestation. The more aggressive you are in discarding the affected plant growth, the greater your chances for long-term success. Rather than dividing a houseplant and hoping the soil under the healthy part of the plant is pest-free, you may want to take a few leaf cuttings and try to propagate the plant by stimulating new root growth in water or fresh potting soil mix.

Many houseplant pests have larvae that can survive common pesticide treatments. If even a single larva is in the soil, roots, stems, or leaves, then the pests may be part of the new plant as well. These larvae are the biggest reason why houseplant pests are hard to get rid of entirely without throwing out the plant and starting over. It’s not impossible and there are plenty of success stories out there, but there are few guarantees.

How to Sanitize Pots from Pests

A lot of people are leery about reusing a houseplant pot that has experienced an infestation. So long as you take a few precautionary steps, there’s no reason to worry about taking the pests with you. Most gardeners will tell you it’s a good idea to wash and disinfect your pots before you plant, anyway. First, you should clean the pots with soap and water. Make sure you remove any significant patches of dirt or grime. Dirt particles render bleach and other sanitizing agents ineffective. Thus, the better job you do cleaning the pots, the easier and more effective the sanitation process.

You shouldn’t have to add anywhere near 2 cups of bleach per gallon of water to disinfect pots. If you do a good job cleaning, 2 tablespoons should be enough. Some people don’t like to use bleach at all but prefer an environmentally friendly option. You can also use vinegar or hydrogen peroxide, but you need to let these disinfectants sit for about 10 minutes. To sanitize your pots, you can use the concentrations found in common household products and brands. This is 5% vinegar and 3% hydrogen peroxide.

Types of Houseplant Pests

The best pest control and treatment plans come from knowing the enemy. Learn about different types of common houseplant pests and what you can do about them.

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Growing Houseplants in Pots without Drainage Holes

In general, we recommend against placing houseplants in pots without drainage whenever possible. You can still use a beautiful decorative pot even if it doesn’t have drainage holes. You can simply use a second interior pot that does have drainage holes. Some type of catchment will make sure you can water your plants generously without making a mess.

That said, there are plenty of examples and effective strategies for growing houseplants in pots without drainage holes. Maybe you already have the perfect size pot and the perfect size plant. Maybe you’re starting with miniature plants and pots that are impractical to layer with two different pots. Maybe you’ve heard that the need for pots with good drainage is overblown. Whatever the reason, here are our tips and advice for growing houseplants in pots without drainage.

Best Watering Practices

First, you need to know exactly what type of houseplant you have and how much soil moisture the plant likes. You need to provide enough moisture to unlock nutrients in the soil without creating standing water that leads to root rot or excess moisture that leads to mold. Even though overwatering is a constant danger, you still need to get the soil wet in every area of the pot. In fact, it’s even more important to water all sides of the pot to saturate the soil with the least amount of water. Using glass jars or other glass containers will allow you to see exactly how much water the soil is taking on and whether the soil is drying out. Using a soil moisture meter is another essential tool to get the water just right.

Pot Size and Gravel

It’s also easier to go without drainage holes for miniature pots and houseplants. Large pots with considerable potting mix take a lot longer to dry out, especially without drainage. With miniature pots, the soil is so close to the surface and the plant needs so little water to begin with, you have a better chance of success. The idea that adding gravel to the bottom of the pot is all you need for drainage is a major houseplant myth and one of the most common mistakes people make with houseplants. It also goes hand-in-hand with overwatering. One thing we do recommend is lining the bottom of the pot with activated charcoal that will help keep the water clean and free of rot.

Growing Houseplants in Water

For many types of plants, this is the easiest way to grow houseplants without drainage holes. For philodendrons, lucky bamboo, and pothos plants especially, this is a great solution. Simply put a cutting of the plant, just below a leaf node, in a glass jar with clean water and plant fertilizer. Make sure the leaves are out of the water and the node is in the water. New roots should form. So long as you keep replacing the water and adding fertilizer, these houseplants should grow and do quite well. When growing houseplants in water, it doesn’t have to be a glass jar. In fact, especially when placed in sunny spots, glass containers can encourage algae growth that threatens the plant. Learn more about propagating and growing houseplants in water.