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Traveling with Houseplants: How to Turn a Plant into the Perfect Souvenir

Many people who love to cultivate houseplants eventually run into the problem of too many plants and too little space. Different times of year bring new successes and challenges in managing house and plant décor. During springtime, there are beautiful, healthy plants of endless variety in local shops. As summer rolls along, new growth can swell the total size of a houseplant, threatening to crowd out nearby plants. During the fall and winter, you’re more likely to be gifted new plants that you need to find space for.

One of the best times to propagate a houseplant is when an out-of-town friend or family member is visiting. You have plenty of chances to give houseplants to your local network of friends, family, and neighbors. If you’re the one traveling with houseplants, you can also do a houseplant trade with this type of family member or long-distance friendship. Especially if you’re trying to make room for new plants, then you can pack and bring some of your full-size houseplants as gifts. In return, you might bring home a cutting to start a new, smaller plant from your friend’s collection.

Best Travel Experiences and Souvenirs for 2020

Houseplants make for great gifts in general, but this year, it can make more sense than ever to turn your houseplants into free gifts and a free source of entertainment. With new distancing rules, there are fewer social events to attend. Houseplant propagation makes for a great at-home crafts project, whether it’s just for your inner circle or whether you want to set up a larger area to maintain distancing. Of course, you can also go to a local gardening shop and buy houseplants. Too many people shy away from these ideas because they think houseplants are too much trouble to travel with. In truth, it’s usually not that hard. By knowing a few tips and tricks, you can create a new houseplant and bring it home.

Tips and Tricks for Packing and Traveling with Houseplants

  • Some houseplant enthusiasts will tell you that the best way to travel with a houseplant is the bare-root approach in which you first knock and wash off the soil. With this approach, you want the roots to be dry. Once you get the houseplant to its destination and repot the plant, it’s time for a generous amount of water to promote new root growth.
  • Other people tell you this approach is unnecessary if you’re not already repotting the plant. You can simply cover the soil and wrap the pot easily enough to prevent the soil from making a mess of things. With this approach, you do want to water the houseplant before packing, but not all at once or to excess. Give the plant a little time to drain before packing. You don’t want to trap water-logged soil near the roots or make the packing material water-logged from runoff.
  • Looking for a souvenir on a road trip and found a plant that the landscape won’t miss? So long as you can get the plant out of the ground, you don’t need a lot of fancy packing materials or even a lot of pre-planning. Stop at a grocery store for a 2-liter of soda or a gallon of milk, and you have a ready-made container for transporting the plant back home.
  • Some plants and cut flowers should be planted in soil or growing medium as soon as possible, but for many houseplants like the jade, you should wait a couple days for the cutting to dry out and better prepare to grow new roots. Even if you run out of time for a crafts project, you can quickly create and pack a plant cutting which you can pot when you get back home. This is also a popular approach when flying with a houseplant.
  • You should try to keep up with best houseplant care practices in the week or so before travel. This includes trimming back and removing any dead growth from the pot. Here is a nifty guide we found for traveling with houseplants on short-distance vs. long-distance trips.

Pay Attention but Be Patient with New Houseplants

Know that houseplants frequently show signs of distress when being repotted or even just when being moved to a new location. Most times, the plant will quickly rebound after adjusting to its new environment.

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